Tag Archives: John Hickenlooper

Hickenlooper makes his Iowa debut as a declared presidential candidate

Colorado Politics Excerpt: Ed Fallon and Kathy Brynes of Bold Iowa, a climate-change organization, said they hoped to hear a strong message of support for climate change over all else. Hickenlooper spoke at length about his efforts to draw environmentalists and the oil and gas industry together to address the state’s methane emissions, a problem more serious than carbon dioxide, he explained. But he didn’t exactly win rousing support from the Bold Iowa contingency, who asked if he would make climate change his top priority. “I’m trying Continue reading →

Make climate the litmus test for presidential candidates

Dear Friends, “It’s so easy to look at the big picture and get completely disheartened. … What we need to remember is what is my own personal moral obligation. When I wake up each day thinking about what I might do from that perspective … when I come at it from a deep sense of moral obligation, it really doesn’t matter what the results are. What matters is am I doing the right thing, and am I doing all I can right now at this Continue reading →

John Hickenlooper

Friday, March 8, 2019 Des Moines Bird Dogs: Kathy Byrnes, Ed Fallon Although John Hickenlooper says climate change is a serious issue, he doesn’t believe the crisis deserves to be prioritized in his campaign. Like both Elizabeth Warren and Andrew Yang, he deflects to his top priority: bringing people together. Sorry, but this is a crisis that needs to be confronted head-on. In response to a question by Karl Knock, Hickenlooper insisted that “fracking doesn’t cause earthquakes.” That’s pretty disappointing, and if you listen to Continue reading →

Are Democrats also climate deniers?

Dear Friends, “The Democrats Are Climate Deniers.” That’s the jarring headline of an article this week in Jacobin that Jon Neiderbach brought to my attention. The sub-heading reads, “If the Democrats really believed the science on climate change, they’d be offering far more radical proposals. We have to make them.” Sad but true. It’s one thing for a politician to say, “I support the Green New Deal (GND).” But when pushed for specifics, most aren’t on board with GND’s “transition to 100% renewable energy within Continue reading →